Matt Helfand
MATT HELFAND / FACEBOOK

Among the numerous acclaimed positions this year is the next undergraduate Board of Governors representative, who will be Matt Helfand.

Helfand, a first-year law student, will fill that role after having previously served on the University Students' Council. Helfand’s experience is impressive as he was formerly the Social Science Students’ Council president and president of the USC last year.

“Having a strong student voice on that body, on that board, is very, very important,” Helfand said. “I thought that running for this position I’d be able to bring my experiences working in student government … and be a strong student voice.”

Being a representative to the Board of Governors will be a different role for Helfand. Unlike his student council roles, it will focus less on tangible platform goals and more on discussing and voting on broader issues affecting the University. Helfand wants to bring forth a strong student voice and influence members on the board to see the student perspective.

In regards to his position being acclaimed like many this year, Helfand looks forward to working with USC and faculty presidents to promote student engagement in campus politics.

“I’m a strong advocate in getting people involved as much as possible, so it is unfortunate that there are some acclamations this year,” Helfand said.

Helfand said he will be diligent and ensure transparency in his role in order to prevent the upheaval the Board has seen in the past year after the president's pay scandal. Helfand defended the doubled salary Amit Chakma received in 2014 at a Senate meeting last spring.

"People are going to be looking for their Board of Governors representative to make sure that they are as accountable as possible and as transparent as possible," Helfand said.

Helfand will begin his two-year term in July.

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Rita is the managing editor of content. She was previously a news editor for two years and recently graduated with an honours specialization in political science.

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